Apple Pencil 1 vs 2: Which is Better?

If you’re in the market for an iPad Pro, chances are you’re also considering purchasing an Apple Pencil. But which one should you get? The first-generation Apple Pencil is a great option for those who are just starting out with digital art, while the second-generation Apple Pencil is a better choice for more experienced artists. In this blog post, we’ll compare the two pens side-by-side to help you make a decision.

Design:

One of the key differences between the two generations of Apple Pencils is the design. The first-generationPencil is a lustrous and plastic finish, while the second-generation Pencil is wooden. The new design is more comfortable to hold and doesn’t feel as slippery in your hand.

The second-generation Pencil also has a flag edge which makes it easier to grip and prevents it from rolling off your desk. The first-generation Pencil is circular, so it’s more difficult to grip and can be more easily misplaced.

Ergonomics:

The Apple Pencil 2 is a revised version of the original. It includes a flat edge to fix the issue that some users experienced with the rolling-down-the-slope problem. Other than that, both have their own individual advantages and disadvantages. The design as a whole is excellently done, from grip to thickness– it feels like using any other pencil on paper when writing.

 Tip:

The difference between the two Apple Pencils’ tips is minimal. The tip of each Apple Pencil is quite firm, regardless if you’re talking about the Apple Pencil 1 or the Apple Pencil 2. To put it more simply, the iPad’s screen feels evenly touched by either stylus. Additionally, the tip is hard, which makes it durable.

Storage:

Where the 2nd Gen Apple Pencil excels over its predecessor is in storage. Because the Apple Pencil 2 magnetically connects to the iPad, it’s no surprise why it is more tempting. In addition, because of this, the first-generation Apple Pencil does not have any storage solution from a formal standpoint.

Charging:

While the Apple Pencil 2 boasts an impressive list of features, one thing that remains constant and important to how we use our styluses is charging. With magnetic storage for both charged & unused tools (a feature I discuss in detail below), this time spent waiting no longer has me anxious or bored; instead, it’s almost relaxing!

Size and Weight

The first thing you’ll notice when comparing the two side-by-side is that the new Apple Pencil is barely shorter and lighter than its predecessor. The overall effect is a more comfortable grip and center of gravity that feels more natural in hand.

Nib Material and Replacement 

One of the largest selling points of the second-generation Pencil is that it now features a replaceable tip. This means that if your nib wears down or you simply want to change things up, you can do so without having to buy an entirely new stylus. The material of the nib has also been updated, providing a smoother writing experience.

Bluetooth Connection 

The original Pencil is connected to your iPad via the Lightning port, while the new model uses Bluetooth LE (Low Energy) for a wireless connection. This makes it much easier to set up and use, as there’s no need to fiddle with cables every time you want to use your Pencil. Plus, it opens up some new capabilities, such as double-tapping to change functions – more on that below.  

DOUBLE-TAPPING FOR TOOLS 

With the new Bluetooth connection comes a whole host of potential new features, including the ability to double-tap on the Pencil itself to change drawing tools. For example, you could set one tap to switch between eraser and pencil modes or two taps to cycle through different brush sizes. Of course, whether or not these features are actually included will depend on individual apps – but we’re sure developers will be quick to take advantage of this newly available functionality.

Conclusion:

If you’re trying to decide between the first and second-generation Apple Pencils, it really depends on your needs as an artist. If you’re just beginning out or you only need basic functionality, then go with the first-generation Pencil. However, if you’re examining more advanced features like pressure sensitivity or Bluetooth connectivity, then go with the second-generation Pencil. Whichever one you prefer, you can’t go wrong!

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